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painting – Draw Like A Pro http://www.drawlikeapro.com Are you ready to become a real artist ? Fri, 20 Nov 2015 11:06:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.5.12 Mounting a Picture http://www.drawlikeapro.com/mounting-a-picture-311/ http://www.drawlikeapro.com/mounting-a-picture-311/#respond Tue, 18 May 2010 09:42:58 +0000 http://www.drawlikeapro.com/?p=311 If you want your drawings or paintings to look even more attractive, you have to learn how to mount them correctly. It’s not difficult and it’s very pleasant. You will be surprised to see how much more attractive they look when they are mounted, even if you decide to glue your work to a simple […]

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If you want your drawings or paintings to look even more attractive, you have to learn how to mount them correctly. It’s not difficult and it’s very pleasant. You will be surprised to see how much more attractive they look when they are mounted, even if you decide to glue your work to a simple sheet of paper.

Only mounting one of your own can allow you to appreciate the effect of quality mounting. A white border will make all the difference in the world. To mount your painting in a very simple way you will need a sheet of clean and thick white paper. It has to be a few inches larger in each direction than the size of the painting. It’s impossible to give exact dimensions because they depend on too many things, but if your picture is 20 inches by 10 inches, for example, try to find a sheet of paper at least 26 inches by 16 inches. Narrow borders are better than no border at all, but they are not as good as wide ones. Placing your picture correctly on its mount is very important if you want it to look as nice as possible. You have to put the sheet of white paper on a flat surface and then you have to put the painting or drawing on it, in what seems to be the best position. Strangely enough, the painting will not look its best if it is exactly at the centre of the mount. The left-hand and right-hand margins should have the same width, but the margin below the picture should be a little wider than the one above it. If you do differently, the picture will look like it’s not firmly mounted. It won’t look as steadily placed, as it would if it was a little above the centre. If you don’t trust your judgment in placing your paintings on their mount, just do a little calculation. 20 inches from 26 inches leaves 6 inches. Divide this equally into two, and you will find that the left. and right-hand margins should be 3 inches each. 10 inches from 16 inches also leaves 6 inches. lf you decide to apply the rule for the top and bottom margin you should not divide equally, but into 3½ inches and 2½ inches, you will be able to make the top margin 2½ inches wide and the bottom margin 3½ inches wide. This way, your mounting will look better proportionned. If you agree with this arrangement, mark the correct positions of the corners of your painting with small pencil marks. Then remove the painting, put a little glue on the back of each corner and put it back between the pencil marks on the mount. Put something heavy but clean on it while it dries. Then pin it up. You will be surprised how much better the painting will look once it has been correctly mounted !

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The Colour Perspective http://www.drawlikeapro.com/the-colour-perspective-206/ http://www.drawlikeapro.com/the-colour-perspective-206/#respond Tue, 21 Jul 2009 09:08:41 +0000 http://www.drawlikeapro.com/?p=206 In order to create an impression of volume and depth one must not overlook what is called colour perspective. The concept is a little more subjective than line perspective or tone and shade perspective. Nobody likes to follow rules about the use of colours. Where to use them and how to use them is very […]

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In order to create an impression of volume and depth one must not overlook what is called colour perspective. The concept is a little more subjective than line perspective or tone and shade perspective. Nobody likes to follow rules about the use of colours. Where to use them and how to use them is very personal. Nevertheless, it is important to know that some colours tend to stay in Hüpfburg Mini Dschungel Open

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the background of a painting or a drawing when others tend to move forward. Once you are trained or if you have a natural sense of perspective, you will be using the right colour with the corresponding subject. To summarize, a warmer colour would be more adapted to an object in the foreground and a colder colour would be more adapted to the background. The painter’s palette is often divided into “warm” and “cold” tints. It is actually not that simple. For example, purple is hard to define as warm or cold. It is admitted though, that yellow or orange would be placed among the warm colours when blue or green would be placed among the cold ones. It makes sense to associate the yellow, red and orange with fire or sun and to associate blue and green with ice or with the ocean. When painting, of course, the general rule can be bent to some extent. If you want to represent somebody with a bright sweater in the background of your picture, you might want to reduce that colour with a little white and if you want to represent somebody with a light colour coat in the foreground of your picture, you have to strengthen it with a darker tone. Nevertheless, the general rule is to use brighter colours in the foreground and lighter colours in the background. Here is an exercise you can try. First imagine this scenery with an old castle, trees, a river and a few people walking around. Divide the scenery in three views: the foreground, the middle ground and the background. In order to be able to see the three views as you superpose them, you need to cut a good size opening on the middle view and a bigger opening on the front view. On the background, you can draw or paint the old castle with people standing by and the sky and clouds above. On the middle view, you can draw the river with trees along the banks and maybe a boat on the water. On the foreground, you can place a group of trees on both sides of the scenery. For the background, you have to limit yourself drastically with the use of colours. The castle, the trees and the sky have to be relatively dull. That means the colours you are using have to be restricted to grey, blue, green and cold or dull tints in general. In any case, when you have to represent something bright in the background, you have to dilute your bright or warm colours with a whitish blue or green. We could say that the colours for a background are close to pastel colours. For the middle view, you can allow yourself to use a little more yellow or brown or dark green. That would be perfect for the river and the trees. As for the foreground, if you want to represent trees and flowers, feel free to use all the bright colours you have in mind. You can also paint somebody with colourful clothes. The scarlet red, the orange or brown are welcome. Now, as you superpose all three images, you will be amazed by the impression of distance between the three different views. As mentioned previously, colours also, are ruled by the laws of perspective; a different kind of laws, but important whatsoever. Of course, once you are totally aware of this principle, you still remain the creating artist. If your inspiration tells you, for any personal reason, to divert from the rule, you are the master.

n order to create an impression of volume and depth one must not overlook what is called colour perspective.

The concept is a little more subjective than line perspective or tone and shade perspective. Nobody likes to follow rules about the use of colours. Where to use them and how to use them is very personal. Nevertheless, it is important to know that some colours tend to stay in the background of a painting or a drawing when others tend to move forward. Once you are trained or if you have a natural sense of perspective, you will be using the right colour with the corresponding subject. To summarize, a warmer colour would be more adapted to an object in the foreground and a colder colour would be more adapted to the background.

The painter’s palette is often divided into “warm” and “cold” tints. It is actually not that simple. For example, purple is hard to define as warm or cold. It is admitted though, that yellow or orange would be placed among the warm colours when blue or green would be placed among the cold ones. It makes sense to associate the yellow, red and orange with fire or sun and to associate blue and green with ice or with the ocean.

When painting, of course, the general rule can be bent to some extent. If you want to represent somebody with a bright sweater in the background of your picture, you might want to reduce that colour with a little white and if you want to represent somebody with a light colour coat in the foreground of your picture, you have to strengthen it with a darker tone. Nevertheless, the general rule is to use brighter colours in the foreground and lighter colours in the background.

Here is an exercise you can try. First imagine this scenery with an old castle, trees, a river and a few people walking around.

Divide the scenery in three views: the foreground, the middle ground and the background.

In order to be able to see the three views as you superpose them, you need to cut a good size opening on the middle view and a bigger opening on the front view.

On the background, you can draw or paint the old castle with people standing by and the sky and clouds above. On the middle view, you can draw the river with trees along the banks and maybe a boat on the water. On the foreground, you can place a group of trees on both sides of the scenery.

For the background, you have to limit yourself drastically with the use of colours. The castle, the trees and the sky have to be relatively dull. That means the colours you are using have to be restricted to grey, blue, green and cold or dull tints in general. In any case, when you have to represent something bright in the background, you have to dilute your bright or warm colours with a whitish blue or green. We could say that the colours for a background are close to pastel colours.

For the middle view, you can allow yourself to use a little more yellow or brown or dark green. That would be perfect for the river and the trees.

As for the foreground, if you want to represent trees and flowers, feel free to use all the bright colours you have in mind. You can also paint somebody with colourful clothes. The scarlet red, the orange or brown are welcome.

Now, as you superpose all three images, you will be amazed by the impression of distance between the three different views. As mentioned previously, colours also, are ruled by the laws of perspective; a different kind of laws, but important whatsoever.

Of course, once you are totally aware of this principle, you still remain the creating artist. If your inspiration tells you, for any personal reason, to divert from the rule, you are the master.

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Two modern painting giants meet in Aix-en-Provence (France) http://www.drawlikeapro.com/two-modern-painting-giants-meet-in-aix-en-provence-france-166/ Thu, 11 Jun 2009 13:41:35 +0000 http://www.drawlikeapro.com/?p=166 (From mai 25th until September 27th 2009) The influence of Cezanne on Picasso is a well recognized and interesting fact among art lovers. The intimate motivations and passions of an artist are always a thrilling aspect of art history. His respect and passion for Cezanne is well illustrated by the purchase of the chateau de […]

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(From mai 25th until September 27th 2009)

The influence of Cezanne on Picasso is a well recognized and interesting fact among art lovers. The intimate motivations and passions of an artist are always a thrilling aspect of art history. His respect and passion for Cezanne is well illustrated by the purchase of the chateau de Vauvenargues at the bottom of the “Sainte-Victoire mountain” in 1959.

Through 110 paintings, drawings, water-color paintings and sculptures, the Granet Museum focuses on the respectful passion of Picasso for Cezanne.
The recent exhibition at the Grand Palais in Paris, “Picasso et les maîtres” showed us an artist, admiror of ancient painting. At the Granet museum, as he presents the love of Picasso for Cezanne’s work , Yves Kneusé uses a bare and even austere decoration as a reminder of the humbleness of Picasso toward the old master. It reminds us of the “Château de Vauvenargues” and its rough and peaceful garrigue (scrubland).

A CONSTANT INFLUENCE

Facing the one he always called “Monsieur Cezanne”, the one he never even dared to meet, the one he saw as his “one and only master”, Picasso is not the conquering adventurer of “Menines” or of “Alger women”. When he decides to climb the Sainte-Victoire mountain more than half a century after the death of the genius of “Provence”, he picks the north side. Almost like he wouldn’t dare going the south side, the dangerous one, the one Cezanne diffracted more than 80 times, revolutionizing art in an irreversible way.

When he thinks of Cezanne who was the most cultivated of the impressionists, Picasso doesn’t put himself first; he is not tempted to play his own role as he often does. What he sees first in Cezanne is the thinker in the process of imagining his own painting says Bruno Ely, director of the museum who, by the diversity of the paintings and drawings, proves himself right.

The exhibition, on about 400 m2, has four sections on two levels. On the bottom floor, Picasso gets the feel of Cezanne’s techniques (sense of values, structuring touch, a permanent lack of balance which, in the end, gives a true balanced composition) and of his themes (Harlequin, the white compote dish, the pipe smoker). We all see the love and respect for the master.

We admire, here, a great understanding of that period of Picasso’s work which is not as well known as the blue, the pink or the cubist period but yet, full of life and vitality. At the age of 77, Picasso finds, in the work space of Cezanne, a new youth.
He also painted sceneries. He painted three times the village of “Vauvenargues”. Unfortunately, we will not be able to enjoy “nude under the pine tree” which had to stay in the Chicago museum.

The Picasso family was actually very generous as they lent forty unpublished paintings. Other museums gave us access to many exceptional masterpieces like that splendid Harlequin by Cezanne who had barely ever left The National Gallery.
Altogether, the exhibition gives us another vision of Picasso’s immense work as we discover, through modern techniques, one major source of inspiration of this master of the 20th century that was Pablo Picasso.

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How to draw water http://www.drawlikeapro.com/how-to-draw-water-53/ Fri, 14 Mar 2008 11:00:36 +0000 http://www.drawlikeapro.com/?p=53 Water, Running water, Reflections, River water movements, Ripples and waves, The seaside, Underwater, Rocks Water Water always gives an aesthetic touch to a landscape drawing or painting. But, just like the clouds in the sky, water can assume so many different forms and we really need to start by putting our thoughts in order. Remember, […]

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Water, Running water, Reflections, River water movements, Ripples and waves, The seaside, Underwater, Rocks

Water

Water always gives an aesthetic touch to a landscape drawing or painting. But, just like the clouds in the sky, water can assume so many different forms and we really need to start by putting our thoughts in order. Remember, water is a fluid: it runs, flows, jumps, gushes and spurts.

Depending on its movement, its own or its reflected colour can change completely. You will doubtless have noticed how a stretch of water which appears dark blue one morning may become green or grey as the day wears on. The influence of the sky is often at work here.buy commercial wrecking ball inflatable

As you know, of course, you cannot rely on the pencil to reproduce colours, so once again you will need to think and observe in terms of values.

Stretches of water. This category will include the sea, lakes, ponds, canals (not strictly speaking running water), puddles and all other forms of static water. In the absence of wind, these waters are nothing more nor less than mirrors forcing you to draw he same subject twice, once the right way up and once “upside down”. That is actually not strictly speaking true since, as you know, the reflection of an object is never entirely identical to the object – or rather, it is the same thing but seen from a different angle.

The module on how to construct reflections in perspectives deals, I hope, with this question fairly clearly so I suggest that we confine ourselves here to the shapes and tones which water can take.

Running water

Streams, rivers, all kinds of waterfall large and small, all natural or artificial spillways fall into the category of running water. Whenever their shape alters their reflections change as well. When you learn to observe a stream, you notice how the water flowing against a rock winds itself in a continuous movement giving the illusion of an unchanging aspect.

We learn that the particles of water making up this border and then a series of wavelets going round an obstacle are in fact in constant movement. And yet we look upon the whole as something more solid, like a sort of vitreous paste left to cool. A photograph which fixes or freezes running water sometimes gives this unreal look to a mass of undulating water.

But in your drawing are you going to emphasise or downplay this special effect?

The photographer’s choice

An accomplished photographer can easily lengthen or reduce the camera’s shutter speed, and when he takes a photo of a waterfall he can choose his exposure time. The result is a different photograph each time. If the exposure time is short the waterfall will be “frozen”, showing thousands of clearly defined drops of water separated from each other like glass marbles rendered elongated by their movement. But in the case of a longer exposure time, several successive positions of each drop will be superimposed on the role of film, thereby creating a plethora of light marks indicating the direction of their movement. The result is a certain blur due to the speed at which the drops move. This result will undoubtedly be more realistic and close to what is perceived by the naked eye.

If you opt for this second approach you will render the effect of blur and movement through lines running parallel to the movement of the water. Don’t overdo this effect or else you run the risk of lapsing into convention. Remember, you are not trying to emulate the cartoon approach where movement is indicated by the lines situated behind the objects. This convention which works very well in comic strip drawings would be entirely out of place in a landscape drawing.

Tonality of reflections in still water In rendering the reflection of an object, you will be at pains to observe the general tonality of what is reflected compared to the original. In many instances, the whole is a little darker and a little less contrasted, but this not always the case. With water, there is sometimes a light mist serving to “bleach” the entire range of tones of the reflected part.

This observation is important for getting you on the right track, but once you have decided whether the reflection is lighter or darker, stick to your guns and be consistent in your range of tones.

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