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method – Draw Like A Pro http://www.drawlikeapro.com Are you ready to become a real artist ? Fri, 20 Nov 2015 11:06:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.5.12 The five volumes http://www.drawlikeapro.com/the-five-volumes-258/ http://www.drawlikeapro.com/the-five-volumes-258/#respond Mon, 22 Feb 2010 13:39:59 +0000 http://www.drawlikeapro.com/?p=258 Drawing animals is a captivating subject. Isn’t it considered the most ancient type of visual art? Actually, as Piet Herzeel points with relevance, what is the most important for this sort of representation? Resemblance to the subject or the specific attitude of the animalUnited States ? Therefore, the artist must ask himself the right questions […]

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Drawing animals is a captivating subject. Isn’t it considered the most ancient type of visual art? Actually, as Piet Herzeel points with relevance, what is the most important for this sort of representation? Resemblance to the subject or the specific attitude of the animalUnited States ?

Therefore, the artist must ask himself the right questions in his observation work. But the animal of your choice, whatever it is, will not pose for you. Piet Herzeel is giving us a method that will allow you to grasp the essential shape of your subject before he takes a position of no interest for your drawing.

The whole method is described in the « Discover » section of the module: « THE FIVE VOLUMES ».

First, we must start with an observation work of the five specific volumes of your animal. These first outlines will give you the essential of your subject’s aspect. You will be able to touch it up later whatever position your animal decides to take.

Before practicing on the animals around you, go to the « Practice » chapter in order to make a first attempt on the rocky mountain goat. Piet Herzeel gives you step by step details on what your eye must look for.

But that’s not all. You will find some extra training exercices with the sketch tool supplied in the module. Several animals of different species to draw in a limited amount of time. A little bit of stress at the beginning because of the countdown but you will be asking for more after you’re done.

With this method, you can show Piet Herzeel what you can do in the « drawings to do «  gallery.

You can pick your own model or one of those displayed on Signus.

The question is: will your sheet be big enough ?

This module is full of surprises. A present is actually waiting for you there and one last advice if you haven’t checked it out yet: go to Gallery/museum on Signus and admire « the young hare » by Dürer. The observation work is amazing.

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What level can I hope for ? http://www.drawlikeapro.com/what-level-can-i-hope-for-256/ http://www.drawlikeapro.com/what-level-can-i-hope-for-256/#respond Mon, 25 Jan 2010 13:05:32 +0000 http://www.drawlikeapro.com/?p=256 Our free trial on SIGNUS is actually a wonderful entrance hall to the world of drawing. It’s not designed to actually give you a certain level but rather to show you what drawing really means, how much time you will need to reach the level you want or what kind of satisfaction you can expect. […]

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Our free trial on SIGNUS is actually a wonderful entrance hall to the world of drawing. It’s not designed to actually give you a certain level but rather to show you what drawing really means, how much time you will need to reach the level you want or what kind of satisfaction you can expect.

As for the full SIGNUS course, on the other hand, I can say with no hesitation that, for most students, a very high level can be reached. For some, it will take 6 months and for others, 18 months. It all depends on the amount of time invested by each one according to the availability.

Technique as well as creativity are both necessary in any artistic occupation. Those elements play a major role in the student’s improvement and they can be quite different depending on the person.

One will often be more at ease in an area more than in the other and, when both aspects meet, that’s when the work can become a masterpiece. That’s what I wish you to discover if you decide to follow the full SIGNUS course.

The free trial is not a full class, it’s only an initiation. It would not be honest on my part to let you think that it will make an advanced artist of you. You can find, however, plenty of fun and discoveries in the world of drawing. No need to reach for a level, then. It doesn’t have to be a goal in itself. You should, instead, ask yourself what could bring you a good amount of satisfaction and joy in your life. Drawing is practically a way of life. Think it over…

Piet Herzeel

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Where is the landscaper in you? http://www.drawlikeapro.com/where-is-the-landscaper-in-you-229/ http://www.drawlikeapro.com/where-is-the-landscaper-in-you-229/#respond Mon, 02 Nov 2009 15:00:41 +0000 http://www.drawlikeapro.com/?p=229 Where is the landscaper in you? Great is the temptation to go through the Signus lesson on landscape too quickly, to swallow it like a child swallows his candy. Be free dating web sightsofficial uk singles chart 2009http://www.backporchmary.com/lates/pmm-singlesdating ariane game walkthrough caberethere careful not to miss the essential. Do you feel like a landscaper? How […]

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Where is the landscaper in you? Great is the temptation to go through the Signus lesson on landscape too quickly, to swallow it like a child swallows his candy. Be
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careful not to miss the essential. Do you feel like a landscaper? How do we find the answer to this question? Having the technique to represent the various elements around us is rather useful, but not sufficient. The different chapters in the lesson give you the tools that will allow you to identify more clearly your understanding of nature as a model: Did you ever find yourself in the country with that “breath taking” feeling because everything seems so alive and majestic? Did you ever see the light makes the colours actually vibrate and have you ever felt the atmosphere full of that quite and peaceful spirit? Have you had the impression of well-being that makes you want to enjoy it as long as possible? Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) loved agitated weather like thunder storms, wild oceans and strong winds… John Constable (1776-1837) thought the sky should be the dominating element of a painting because “it is source of light and it overpowers everything” David Cox (1783-1859) wrote, in his treaty on landscaping: « the main part in painting landscape lies in communicating to our spirit the most powerful effect that various landscapes can produce.” What about you? Do you know what really moves you in a scenery? The quality of the Signus lesson on landscape lies in making you meet the subject with a strong observation work, true guide line of the Signus course, with a deep introspection, putting feelings into words, identifying what makes our spirit fully enthused.

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What do we need to be an artist? http://www.drawlikeapro.com/what-do-we-need-to-be-an-artist-211/ http://www.drawlikeapro.com/what-do-we-need-to-be-an-artist-211/#respond Fri, 28 Aug 2009 10:20:50 +0000 http://www.drawlikeapro.com/?p=211 First of all, let’s get rid of questions useless to any student: Do I have talent? Am I gifted? You are what you are and if you take pleasure in studying how to draw, you have just enough talent to enjoy yourself and appreciate the different improvements in your skills. bounce houses In Signus drawing […]

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First of all, let’s get rid of questions useless to any student: Do I have talent? Am I gifted?
You are what you are and if you take pleasure in studying how to draw, you have just enough talent to enjoy yourself and appreciate the different improvements in your skills.
bounce houses

In Signus drawing course, Piet Herzeel shows us how to concentrate on what’s essential: What do we really need to improve?
Here are the main tools we will be using all along the course:

  • The method:

Piet Herzeel’s program is very progressive. It allows you to fully and deeply improve what needs to be improved.

  • The material:

We learn how to use the different tools for drawing and how to choose the one most adapted to your projects and to your sensitivity.

  • Ideas and inspiration:

That’s where any creation starts but there is no inspiration without a source. It’s
one of Piet’s Herzeel’s goals to show us how to find that source.

  • Time:

Don’t be afraid to let time be your ally in the learning process.

  • Desire and pleasure:

That’s where the motor of the whole process lies and as such, it needs to be regularly trained.

  • Develop your skills:

Your brain, your eyes and your hand must learn how to work together toward the same goal: drawing.

Finally, with the exercises to be done at the end of each module, Piet Herzeel gives us a practical demonstration of the many differences between the images we engrave in our memory and the reality.

First of all, let’s get rid of questions useless to any student: Do I have talent? Am I gifted?

You are what you are and if you take pleasure in studying how to draw, you have just enough talent to enjoy yourself and appreciate the different improvements in your skills.

In Signus drawing course, Piet Herzeel shows us how to concentrate on what’s essential: What do we really need to improve?

Here are the main tools we will be using all along the course:

  • The method:

Piet Herzeel’s program is very progressive. It allows you to fully and deeply improve what needs to be improved.

  • The material:

We learn how to use the different tools for drawing and how to choose the one most adapted to your projects and to your sensitivity.

– Ideas and inspiration:

That’s where any creation starts but there is no inspiration without a source. It’s

one of Piet’s Herzeel’s goals to show us how to find that source.

Time:

Don’t be afraid to let time be your ally in the learning process.

  • Desire and pleasure:

That’s where the motor of the whole process lies and as such, it needs to be regularly trained.

  • Develop your skills:

Your brain, your eyes and your hand must learn how to work together toward the same goal: drawing.

Finally, with the exercises to be done at the end of each module, Piet Herzeel gives us a practical demonstration of the many differences between the images we engrave in our memory and the reality.

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Drapery http://www.drawlikeapro.com/drapery-172/ http://www.drawlikeapro.com/drapery-172/#respond Tue, 07 Jul 2009 08:19:23 +0000 http://www.drawlikeapro.com/?p=172 The study of drapery is happily one that can be carried on at almost any place, time, and season, and perhaps it is because of this very ease of access that it is so often neglected and many an otherwise satisfactory picture will be marred by the poor drawing of drapery and clothing. When the […]

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The study of drapery is happily one that can be carried on at almost any place, time, and season, and perhaps it is because of this very ease of access that it is so often neglected and many an otherwise satisfactory picture will be marred by the poor drawing of drapery and clothing. When the weather is unsuitable for sketching, when there is no person available as a model, time may well be spent on a little practice in drawing drapery. Take any piece of material, a handkerchief for lack of anything better. Pin it up on the wall or to a curtain—anywhere so long as it falls in natural folds—and make a sketch of it. Notice the tendency to trian­gular forms, the way in which the folds radiate from the pin, and the foreshortening of the curves which form the bottom edge of the handkerchief. Having satisfied yourself with that sketch, take the handkerchief down and throw it over some object such as a book standing on edge or an inverted flower vase, and make another sketch. Notice the arrangement of the folds; they will end abruptly at the top if falling from a sharp edge, and will
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fade away gradually from a rounded shape. Something of the underlying object should be obvious from your drawing of the handkerchief in the same way that clothes should suggest the limbs and body they cover. Then make a sketch of it, knotted, or tied around something. As you tie the knot (which makes the best study if not tied too tightly), notice which fold passes behind and where it reappears, and be on the lookout for this continuity when you come to draw it. Fig. 117 to 123 show outline studies of drapery. Fig. 117 shows it loosely looped around the figure in natural folds. Long, sweeping lines predominate. In Fig.118 it is more bunched, and the long lines are disturbed and irregular. In Fig. 119 the fluted line of the edge of the material is noticeable. Fig. 120 shows the abrupt change of line where the drapery trails on the floor. In Fig. 123 the triangular form of the folds is again plain, and also the fluted edge. Fig. 122 emphasizes the under­lying human form even though the drapery is voluminous.Fig. 121 shows the flowing lines and repetition of form in material blown by the wind. The usual tendency in drawing drapery is to shun straight lines and make the folds too rounded. The angularity in Figs. 120 and 123 should be noted. Figs. 124 and 129 show how the lines of material, in one case loosely and in the other more closely draped, follow and suggest the form they cover. Fig. 126, a sketch of Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens, shows the charm of simply interpreted drapery; Fig. 125, the elaborate arrange­ment of a bygone fashion. Fig. 127 is given to show that the ragged, careless effect of old clothes may be accentuated by ragged and somewhat carefree lines. Fig. 128 gives folds of a thick, rich material. The broad folds show the thick, com­parative stiffness of the drapery and the reflected light in the shadows suggests the sheen of brocade. Thick material will not fall into narrow folds unless artificially arranged, and will tend to straight lines and angles. Thin material falls in narrower, less clearly defined folds with more flowing lines and rounder corners. drapery loosely looped around the figure in natural foldsdrapery118drapery119drapery120drapery121drapery122drapery123drapery124drapery125drapery126drapery127drapery128drapery129

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