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Colour & composition – Draw Like A Pro http://www.drawlikeapro.com Are you ready to become a real artist ? Fri, 20 Nov 2015 11:06:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.5.12 Christine’s thoughts on her Brussels art session http://www.drawlikeapro.com/christines-thoughts-on-her-brussels-art-session-403/ http://www.drawlikeapro.com/christines-thoughts-on-her-brussels-art-session-403/#respond Mon, 31 Oct 2011 11:52:19 +0000 http://www.drawlikeapro.com/?p=403 “These were 2 weeks of pure happiness, from beginning until the end. We had some challenges of course, particularly during the first week, but I can sincerely say that I’m happy and proud I took this session.” Christine actually picked a rather difficult subject. One of the objects in her still life was in fact […]

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Easels... More easels...“These were 2 weeks of pure happiness, from beginning until the end. We had some challenges of course,
particularly during the first week, but I can sincerely say that I’m happy and proud I took this session.”

Christine actually picked a rather difficult subject. One of the objects in her still life was in fact a mother-of-pearl box.

“These were small objects that I like very much and I always dreamt of being able to paint them some day”.

Christine passed over each step and managed, according to one of the objectives of the course, to completely change her values on at least two aspects. She used her retina in a different way. Christine was actually able to improve her observation skills by a major step, not only with shapes but also with tints, colors and reflexions
Still life by Christine

 

Whenever we look at an object, we actually only see that particular object. Then, we see the details of the object and only then, do we see the details of the details.

Christine noticed that each time she was moving her eyes or her head by half an inch, the spots reflecting the specter broken down into the mother-of-pearl box were different. She actually was the only person of the class who used turquoise and bright pink to render the reflection of the mother-of-pearl.

To summarize that exceptional training session, Christine, mentioned the incredible riches of both the human aspect and the artistic discoveries.

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Lines and masses http://www.drawlikeapro.com/lines-and-masses-224/ http://www.drawlikeapro.com/lines-and-masses-224/#respond Fri, 02 Oct 2009 08:27:10 +0000 http://www.drawlikeapro.com/?p=224 You have in mind a particular drawing you decided to work on. You might not have anything specific in mind but you want to draw what’s in front of you. Being lucky, you happen to have your pencil and sketch board. What can you do? Start drawing, of course! But how? Do you start drawing […]

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You have in mind a particular drawing you decided to work on. You might not have anything specific in mind but you want to draw what’s in front of you. Being lucky, you happen to have your pencil and sketch board. What can you do? Start drawing, of course! But how? Do you start drawing lines or would you rather go with the masses? Do you outline right away or do you apply shades and fill up blanks? Maybe both at the same time? So there are two approaches about drawing, LINES and MASSES. Unless you feel at ease with both ways, it is
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better to be good at one of them at least. Don’t get me wrong, my purpose is not only to allow you to figure out what is your favourite style but also to favour one style or the other according to what you are looking for. That’s the first question you have to ask yourself if you want to make an accomplished drawing. In his class, Piet Herzeel gives us thinking paths all necessary to the construction of a deep and inspired drawing:

  • What do you want to show or outline in particular?
  • What tool to use? Which pencil to use and how hard?
  • What would be the proper base? In what way can this influence your work?
  • How to choose the best angle?

In the “workshop” tab you can practice with a concrete example and understand why, according to the subject you picked, you should choose lines or masses and how you can define and reproduce the right intensity of your masses. Piet Herzeel shows us, step by step, how to build a scale with different shades of grey and how to sort them out in order to avoid having too many tones. You can try out both styles in the exercises that Piet Herzeel suggests at the end of this module. You can, for example, make out a drawing according to the chart that you just created. Pencils ready! Squint your eyes! Start drawing!

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The Colour Perspective http://www.drawlikeapro.com/the-colour-perspective-206/ http://www.drawlikeapro.com/the-colour-perspective-206/#respond Tue, 21 Jul 2009 09:08:41 +0000 http://www.drawlikeapro.com/?p=206 In order to create an impression of volume and depth one must not overlook what is called colour perspective. The concept is a little more subjective than line perspective or tone and shade perspective. Nobody likes to follow rules about the use of colours. Where to use them and how to use them is very […]

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In order to create an impression of volume and depth one must not overlook what is called colour perspective. The concept is a little more subjective than line perspective or tone and shade perspective. Nobody likes to follow rules about the use of colours. Where to use them and how to use them is very personal. Nevertheless, it is important to know that some colours tend to stay in Hüpfburg Mini Dschungel Open

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the background of a painting or a drawing when others tend to move forward. Once you are trained or if you have a natural sense of perspective, you will be using the right colour with the corresponding subject. To summarize, a warmer colour would be more adapted to an object in the foreground and a colder colour would be more adapted to the background. The painter’s palette is often divided into “warm” and “cold” tints. It is actually not that simple. For example, purple is hard to define as warm or cold. It is admitted though, that yellow or orange would be placed among the warm colours when blue or green would be placed among the cold ones. It makes sense to associate the yellow, red and orange with fire or sun and to associate blue and green with ice or with the ocean. When painting, of course, the general rule can be bent to some extent. If you want to represent somebody with a bright sweater in the background of your picture, you might want to reduce that colour with a little white and if you want to represent somebody with a light colour coat in the foreground of your picture, you have to strengthen it with a darker tone. Nevertheless, the general rule is to use brighter colours in the foreground and lighter colours in the background. Here is an exercise you can try. First imagine this scenery with an old castle, trees, a river and a few people walking around. Divide the scenery in three views: the foreground, the middle ground and the background. In order to be able to see the three views as you superpose them, you need to cut a good size opening on the middle view and a bigger opening on the front view. On the background, you can draw or paint the old castle with people standing by and the sky and clouds above. On the middle view, you can draw the river with trees along the banks and maybe a boat on the water. On the foreground, you can place a group of trees on both sides of the scenery. For the background, you have to limit yourself drastically with the use of colours. The castle, the trees and the sky have to be relatively dull. That means the colours you are using have to be restricted to grey, blue, green and cold or dull tints in general. In any case, when you have to represent something bright in the background, you have to dilute your bright or warm colours with a whitish blue or green. We could say that the colours for a background are close to pastel colours. For the middle view, you can allow yourself to use a little more yellow or brown or dark green. That would be perfect for the river and the trees. As for the foreground, if you want to represent trees and flowers, feel free to use all the bright colours you have in mind. You can also paint somebody with colourful clothes. The scarlet red, the orange or brown are welcome. Now, as you superpose all three images, you will be amazed by the impression of distance between the three different views. As mentioned previously, colours also, are ruled by the laws of perspective; a different kind of laws, but important whatsoever. Of course, once you are totally aware of this principle, you still remain the creating artist. If your inspiration tells you, for any personal reason, to divert from the rule, you are the master.

n order to create an impression of volume and depth one must not overlook what is called colour perspective.

The concept is a little more subjective than line perspective or tone and shade perspective. Nobody likes to follow rules about the use of colours. Where to use them and how to use them is very personal. Nevertheless, it is important to know that some colours tend to stay in the background of a painting or a drawing when others tend to move forward. Once you are trained or if you have a natural sense of perspective, you will be using the right colour with the corresponding subject. To summarize, a warmer colour would be more adapted to an object in the foreground and a colder colour would be more adapted to the background.

The painter’s palette is often divided into “warm” and “cold” tints. It is actually not that simple. For example, purple is hard to define as warm or cold. It is admitted though, that yellow or orange would be placed among the warm colours when blue or green would be placed among the cold ones. It makes sense to associate the yellow, red and orange with fire or sun and to associate blue and green with ice or with the ocean.

When painting, of course, the general rule can be bent to some extent. If you want to represent somebody with a bright sweater in the background of your picture, you might want to reduce that colour with a little white and if you want to represent somebody with a light colour coat in the foreground of your picture, you have to strengthen it with a darker tone. Nevertheless, the general rule is to use brighter colours in the foreground and lighter colours in the background.

Here is an exercise you can try. First imagine this scenery with an old castle, trees, a river and a few people walking around.

Divide the scenery in three views: the foreground, the middle ground and the background.

In order to be able to see the three views as you superpose them, you need to cut a good size opening on the middle view and a bigger opening on the front view.

On the background, you can draw or paint the old castle with people standing by and the sky and clouds above. On the middle view, you can draw the river with trees along the banks and maybe a boat on the water. On the foreground, you can place a group of trees on both sides of the scenery.

For the background, you have to limit yourself drastically with the use of colours. The castle, the trees and the sky have to be relatively dull. That means the colours you are using have to be restricted to grey, blue, green and cold or dull tints in general. In any case, when you have to represent something bright in the background, you have to dilute your bright or warm colours with a whitish blue or green. We could say that the colours for a background are close to pastel colours.

For the middle view, you can allow yourself to use a little more yellow or brown or dark green. That would be perfect for the river and the trees.

As for the foreground, if you want to represent trees and flowers, feel free to use all the bright colours you have in mind. You can also paint somebody with colourful clothes. The scarlet red, the orange or brown are welcome.

Now, as you superpose all three images, you will be amazed by the impression of distance between the three different views. As mentioned previously, colours also, are ruled by the laws of perspective; a different kind of laws, but important whatsoever.

Of course, once you are totally aware of this principle, you still remain the creating artist. If your inspiration tells you, for any personal reason, to divert from the rule, you are the master.

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Colour and colouring in your drawings http://www.drawlikeapro.com/colour-and-colouring-in-your-drawings-29/ http://www.drawlikeapro.com/colour-and-colouring-in-your-drawings-29/#respond Wed, 14 Nov 2007 10:26:20 +0000 http://www.drawlikeapro.com/?p=29 Learn to draw lines You must master your pencil, there are many types of lines to draw, not just straight or curved. The style of line will depend not only on the type of pencil and support but also the gesture and movement of the artist while tracing. The angle and shape of the tip […]

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Animals

Learn to draw lines

You must master your pencil, there are many types of lines to draw, not just straight or curved. The style of line will depend not only on the type of pencil and support but also the gesture and movement of the artist while tracing. The angle and shape of the tip cheap bouncy houses, the pressure applied… are all ingredients to forming a different stroke. Pencil strokes

Using colour

Change the pressure you

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apply to obtain shaded of grey Try practicing to obtain the following effect

Shading
This article is an extract of the Signus online drawing course

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